Leftshift’s Weblog

Techniques to improve your code

Plain Text Story Runner using RSpec

At work we have started looking at the use of automated accpetance tests to provide validation of our development efforts. There are quite a few tools out there that can help with this; FitNesse, RSpec, NSpec, Selenium, Watir and WatiN to name a few.

So far we have found most success with RSpec and Watir. RSpec allows us to create plain text stories and acceptance criteria and run these as part of our integration builds. The slight problem we have is that we are mainly a .NET shop so using Ruby poses a few problems with regards to experience and knowledge. Unfortunately NSpec [which incorporates NBehave] doesn’t currently have a plain text story runner. Anyway here’s how you go about setting up RSpec in three simple steps.

Step 1: Write your story and acceptance criteria and save in a plain text file

Step 2: Create the story interpreter

Step 3: Create the runner

So without further ado I’ll explain each step in detail: Continue reading

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26 June 2008 Posted by | Automation | , , , | Leave a comment

The Chicken Dance

Well, that’s what it sounds like when my antipodean friends talk about the process of checking in code. Seriously though, development is a complex beast as you realise when you start talking in detail about any of the constituent tasks that a developer is responsible for. Take developers testing responsibilities as an example [which I conveniently ran a workshop on last week]. These break down into the two broad areas of verification and validation.

A workshop to figure these things out is a very useful tool and one that I would recommend at your workplace. It is truly incredible the depth of coverage you can get in a topic with ten people sitting around the table. We spent 5-10 minutes where everybody wrote down each responsibility or task they could think of on a separate post-it. We went through a whole pack of post-it notes [admittedly with a bit of duplication]. We then took it in turns to stick the post-its on the board, roughly grouping and recognising duplicates as we did so. I’m currently busy writing these up for our internal wiki. Making developers aware of the broad range of testing tasks and supporting this with automation of acceptance tests, unit tests etc. will really help improve the quality of the code delivered to the QA teams and eventually the customer. Ideally everybody will pick up on this and you will end up with a zero defect culture.

12 May 2008 Posted by | Code Quality, Metrics | , | Leave a comment

Standards and Guidelines are Useless

That is quite a bold statement I just made, but bear with me. I’ve come to the opinion that all standards, guidelines and best practices are useless if they only exist in a document somewhere. Invariably this document gets lost down the back of the enterprise sofa weeks after its initial distribution. Developers stop refering to it, it goes out of date and new developers are unaware of its existence.

The good news is that this problem can be solved quite simply. Automation is the answer and it places even more importance in having a sensible CI [Continuous Integration] strategy. All of the things that are truly important to the quality of your code can be automated. Standards and guidelines can be checked. By integrating these checks into your build platform developers receive regular feedback that they are more likely to act upon. Nightly builds can be set up to provide a full suite of information about adherence to standards and guidelines along with build health. These can include for example the standard stuff such as unit test coverage alongside naming convention, web accessibility & code readability checks. When the standard or guideline is changed developers get feedback about this at worst by the next day.

By eliminating waste in the feedback loop and ensuring that code is tested against the standards in place, you will quickly start to see the real effect of these standards and take an agile approach to evolving them to improve your codebase.

7 May 2008 Posted by | Code Quality, Metrics | , , | 1 Comment